Radioactive dating exercise - Radioactive Dating - HyperPhysics Concepts


 · Discussion on the inaccuracies found using the Carbon-14 dating method, and the various other radioactive dating methods. Plus evidence for a much younger ...

A process for determining the age of an object by measuring the amount of a given radioactive material it contains. If one knows how much of this radioactive material was present initially in the object (by determining how much of the material has decayed), and one knows the half-life of the material, one can deduce the age of the object.

Once living things die, they no longer can exchange carbon with the environment. The isotope 14 C is radioactive, and beta-decays with a half-life of 5,730 years. This means that in 5,730 years, only half of the 14 C will remain, and after 11,460 years, only one quarter of the 14 C remains. Thus, the ratio of 14 C to 12 C will change from one in one-trillion at the time of death to one in two trillion 5,730 years later and one in four-trillion 11,460 years later. Very accurate measurements of the amount of 14 C remaining, either by observing the beta decay of 14 C or by accelerator mass spectroscopy (using a particle accelerator to separate 12 C from 14 C and counting the amount of each) allows one to date the death of the once-living things.


Radioactive dating exercise

Radioactive dating exercise